Complex and Unusual Creatures - Part Three

51. Lion's Mane Jellyfish

The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. The bell can grow up to 8 feet in diameter with hundreds of tentacles up to 120 feet long. Remarkably, only 6% of the jellyfish is solid matter; the rest is water.

52. The Walking Fish

“Walking fish” is a pretty general term used to describe any fish that is able to travel over land. Ironically, the Mexican walking fish isn’t a fish at all, but an amphibian. It’s official name is axolotl and as the name suggests, it’s found in Mexico. Amphibians are a cold-blooded vertebrate animal of a class that comprises the frogs, toads, newts, and salamanders.

53. The Amazon Milk Frog

The Amazon milk frog, a large species of arboreal frog native to the Amazon Rainforest in South America.

54. The Leatherback Sea Turtle

The Leatherback Sea Turtle is the largest turtle in the world, weighing approximately 900kg. Contrary to appearance, the leatherback doesn’t actually have a shell. What looks like a shell is in fact a leathery skin supported by small bones. This gives it a flexibility that a solid shell would not provide, allowing it to dive to astonishing depths.

55. Pink Bottlenose Dolphin

56. The Hermit Crab

Most hermit crabs salvage empty seashells to shelter and protect their soft abdomens, from which they derive the name ‘hermit’. There are about five hundred known species of hermit crabs in the world, most of which are aquatic. They have a long body and long legs that are very soft. Their bodies are quite vulnerable and that is why they have to rely on that shell to offer them plenty of protection.

The Hermit Crab isn’t able to bite because they don’t have any teeth. However, they do have the ability to pinch. As hermit crabs grow, they must exchange their shell for a larger one.

57. Albino Alligator

58. Albino Whale

59. Albino Giraffe

60. Indian Bull Frog

61. The Pacu Fish

62. The Shoebill

This large stork-like bird gets its name because of the shape of its beak. Even though it was already known to ancient Egyptians and Arabs, the bird was only classified in the 19th century.

63. The Okapi

This mammal is native to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Central Africa. Despite the zebra-like stripes, it is actually more closely related to giraffes.

64. The Scotoplane (Sea Pig)

Scotoplanes live on deep ocean bottoms, specifically on the abyssal plain in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean, typically at depths of over 1000 meters. They are deposit feeders, and obtain food by extracting organic particles from deep-sea mud.

65. The Tufted Deer 

The tufted deer is a small species of deer characterized by a prominent tuft of black hair on its forehead and fang-like canines for the males.

66. Dumbo Octopus 

These octopuses are commonly nicknamed "Dumbo octopuses“ in reference to how the ear-like fins protruding from the top of their head-like bodies resemble the ears of Walt Disney's flying elephant Dumbo.

67. Blob Skulpins

The 2-foot-long fish is rather reclusive and not often seen, but blob sculpins have been known to dote on their young. Scientists have observed males guarding rocky seafloor nesting sites, filled with hundreds of pale pink eggs, in mile-deep waters off the California coast.

68. The Fangtooth

This fish, also called an ogrefish, while understandably named for their disproportionately large, fang-like teeth and unapproachable visage, are actually quite small and harmless to humans: the larger of the two species, the common fangtooth, reaches a maximum length of just 6 inches; the short-thorn fangtooth is about half this size.

69. The Patagonian Mara

The Patagonian mara is a relatively large rodent. It is also known as the Patagonian cavy, Patagonian hare or dillaby. This herbivorous, somewhat rabbit-like animal is found in open and semi-open habitats in Argentina, including large parts of Patagonia.

70. The Naked Mole Rat

The naked mole-rat also known as the sand puppy or desert mole rat, is a burrowing mammal native to parts of East Africa.

71. The Narwhal

This toothed whale, found in the arctic, has been valued for over 1000 years by the Inuit people for its meat and ivory. The narwhal, however, is especially sensitive to the climate change.

72. Star-Nosed Mole

The star-nosed mole is easily identifiable by the twenty-two pink fleshy appendages ringing its snout which is used as a touch organ with more than 25,000 minute sensory receptors, known as Eimer's organs, with which this hamster sized mole feels its way around. With the help of its Eimer's organs, it may be perfectly poised to detect seismic wave vibrations.

73. Sunda Colugo

The Sunda flying lemur, also known as the Malayan flying lemur, Sunda Colugo or Malayan colugo, is a species of colugo. Until recently, it was thought to be one of only two species of flying lemur, the other being the Philippine flying lemur which is found only in the Philippines.

74. Dugong

The dugong is a medium-sized marine mammal. It is one of four living species of the order Sirenia, which also includes three species of manatees. The dugong is the only strictly herbivorous marine mammal.

75. Japanese Spider Crab

The Japanese spider crab is a species of marine crab that lives in the waters around Japan. It has the largest leg span of any arthropod. It is the subject of fishery and is considered a delicacy.